git.gnu.io has moved to IP address 209.51.188.249 -- please double check where you are logging in.

Commit 840d5f58 authored by Thomas Karpiniec's avatar Thomas Karpiniec

Delete all of the old wacky DIY php rendering

parent b97d07d8
docs/_build/
rendered/
venv/
*~
.*.swp
<?php
// Title of manual, to appear in header and page title
$config["title"] = "The Unofficial Admin Manual";
// Directory (relative to render.php) where html pages are located
$config["html_dir"] = "html/admin";
// Directory (relative to render.php) where static resources are located
$config["resources_dir"] = "resources/admin";
// Name of subdirectory in the output where used resources are placed
$config["resources_output_dir"] = "res_admin";
// Where rendered output is placed
$config["output_dir"] = "rendered/admin";
// Page listing
// These must be specified in the order you want them to appear
// id - If "foo" will look for "foo.html"
// title - Used in the table of contents and {PAGE_TITLE:foo} substitutions
$config["pages"] = array(
array("id" => "installing", "title" => "Installing GNU social"),
array("id" => "queue_daemons", "title" => "Using Queue Daemons"),
array("id" => "backup_restore", "title" => "Backing Up and Restoring"),
array("id" => "upgrading", "title" => "Upgrading Your Installation"),
array("id" => "protocol_overview", "title" => "Protocol Overview"),
array("id" => "contributing", "title" => "Contributing")
);
?>
\ No newline at end of file
<?php
// Title of manual, to appear in header and page title
$config["title"] = "The Unofficial User Manual";
// Directory (relative to render.php) where html pages are located
$config["html_dir"] = "html/user";
// Directory (relative to render.php) where static resources are located
$config["resources_dir"] = "resources/user";
// Name of subdirectory in the output where used resources are placed
$config["resources_output_dir"] = "res_user";
// Where rendered output is placed
$config["output_dir"] = "rendered/user";
// Page listing
// These must be specified in the order you want them to appear
// id - If "foo" will look for "foo.html"
// title - Used in the table of contents and {PAGE_TITLE:foo} substitutions
$config["pages"] = array(
array("id" => "what_is_gnu_social", "title" => "What is GNU social"),
array("id" => "getting_started", "title" => "Getting Started"),
array("id" => "exploring", "title" => "Exploring the Network"),
array("id" => "tags", "title" => "Hashtags and Groups")
);
?>
\ No newline at end of file
{HEADING:SECTION:backup_procedure:Backing Up}
<p>It is important to back up GNU social regularly. If you need to revert to an old backup you will lose any newer notices. Any follows that happened since then will result in mismatched information on your server and remote servers.</p>
<p>You should also back up immediately prior to any upgrade. This is especially important if you are following the <i>nightly</i> branch where serious bugs might slip through.</p>
<p>There are two parts to your GNU social installation and they most <i>both</i> be backed up at the same time.</p>
<ol>
<li>The files hosted by your webserver. This is a mixture of GNU social code and user data. This a directory probably located somewhere like <tt>/var/www/social</tt>.</li>
<li>The contents of the MariaDB/MySQL database.</li>
</ol>
{HEADING:SUBSECTION:backup_web_files:Web Files}
<p>You don't need to do anything fancy. Just make sure you have a copy of the folder. If you're using a commercial web hosting service there is probably a button you can press to download an archive of all your files. Note that this normally does <em>not</em> include your database.</p>
<p>If you have shell access on the server, assuming the GNU social folder is located at <tt>/var/www/social</tt>, you can make a compressed backup in your home directory like this:</p>
<p>
<tt>TIMESTAMP=$(date +%Y%m%d-%H%M)</tt><br />
<tt>cd /var/www</tt><br />
<tt>tar -Jcf "~/$TIMESTAMP-social-www.tar.xz" --exclude=.git social</tt>
</p>
<p>If you are serving files straight out of the git repository this will back up only the currently checked out copy, not the entire history. (Using a git repository this way is not recommended as you may cause chaos in your database if you accidentally check out the wrong thing.)</p>
{HEADING:SUBSECTION:backup_database:Database}
<p>There are many different tools and techniques for backing up MySQL databases. If you're using a commercial web hosting service there will probably be somewhere in the web interface where you can download a copy of the GNU social database.</p>
<p>If you have shell access the simplest way to create a backup is using the tool <i>mysqldump</i>.</p>
<p>
<tt>TIMESTAMP=$(date +%Y%m%d-%H%M)</tt><br />
<tt>mysqldump -u "database_username" -p "database_name" | xz -c - > "~/$TIMESTAMP-social.sql.xz"</tt>
</p>
<p>You will be prompted for a password. Type in the password for the MySQL user.</p>
{HEADING:SECTION:restore_procedure:Restoring from a Backup}
<ol>
<li>Stop the queue daemons if they're running.</li>
<li>Restore the web files.</li>
<li>Restore the database.</li>
<li>Restart the queue daemons.</li>
</ol>
<p>If you followed the examples above you might type the following:</p>
<pre>cd /var/www/social
# Stop the daemons
bash ./scripts/stopdaemons.sh
# Delete and restore the web files
rm -r *
cd ..
tar -Jxf ~/20160130-1200-social-www.tar.xz
# Recreate the database (using MySQL root account)
mysqladmin -u root -p drop social
mysqladmin -u root -p create social
mysql -u root -p social
# Inside mysql client
GRANT ALL on social.* TO 'social'@'localhost' IDENTIFIED BY 'the_old_password';
exit
# Restore the database as the GNU social MySQL user
xzcat ~/20160130-1200-social.sql.xz | mysql -u social -p social
# Restart the queue daemons
cd social
bash ./scripts/startdaemons.sh</pre>
{HEADING:SECTION:translations:Translations}
<p>For info on helping with translations, see the <a href="https://www.transifex.com/projects/p/gnu-social/">platform currently in use</a> for translations.</p.
Translations use the <a href="http://www.gnu.org/software/gettext/">gettext system</a>. If you for some reason do not wish to sign up to the Transifex service, you can review the files in the "locale/" sub-directory of GNU social. Each plugin also has its own translation files.
<p>To get your own site to use all the translated languages, and you are tracking the git repo, you will need to install at least 'gettext' on your system and then run:</p>
<p><tt>$ make translations</tt></p>
This diff is collapsed.
GNU social runs primarily on voodoo magic.
If anybody knows better please advise.
{HEADING:SECTION:queues_and_daemons:Queues and Daemons}
<p>Some activities that GNU social needs to do, like broadcast OStatus, SMS, XMPP messages and TwitterBridge operations, can be 'queued' and done by off-line bots instead.</p>
<p>Two mechanisms are available to achieve offline operations:</p>
<ul>
<li>New embedded OpportunisticQM plugin, which is enabled by default</li>
<li>Legacy queuedaemon script, which can be enabled via config file.</li>
</ul>
{HEADING:SUBSECTION:opportunisticqm:OpportunisticQM plugin}
<p>This plugin is enabled by default. It tries its best to do background jobs during regular HTTP requests, like API or HTML pages calls.</p>
<p>Since queueing system is enabled by default, notices to be broadcasted will be stored, by default, into DB (table <tt>queue_item</tt>).</p>
<p>Whenever it has time, OpportunisticQM will try to handle some of them.</p>
<p>This is a good solution whether you:</p>
<ul>
<li>have no access to command line (shared hosting)</li>
<li>do not want to deal with long-running PHP processes</li>
<li>run a low traffic GNU social instance</li>
</ul>
<p>In other case, you really should consider enabling the queuedaemon for performance reasons. Background daemons are necessary anyway if you wish to use the Instant Messaging features such as communicating via XMPP.</p>
{HEADING:SUBSECTION:queuedaemon:queuedaemon}
<p>If you want to use legacy queuedaemon, you must be able to run long-running offline processes, either on your main Web server or on another server you control. (Your other server will still need all the above prerequisites, with the exception of Apache.) Installing on a separate server is probably a good idea for high-volume sites.</p>
<ol>
<li>
<p>You'll need the "CLI" (command-line interface) version of PHP installed on whatever server you use.</p>
<p>Modern PHP versions in some operating systems have disabled functions related to forking, which is required for daemons to operate. To make this work, make sure that your php-cli config (<tt>/etc/php5/cli/php.ini</tt>) does NOT have these functions listed under 'disable_functions':</p>
<ul>
<li>pcntl_fork, pcntl_wait, pcntl_wifexited, pcntl_wexitstatus, pcntl_wifsignaled, pcntl_wtermsig
</ul>
<p>Other recommended settings for optimal performance are:</p>
<ul>
<li><tt>mysqli.allow_persistent = On</tt></li>
<li><tt>mysqli.reconnect = On</tt></li>
</ul>
</li>
<li>
<p>If you're using a separate server for queues, install GNU social somewhere on the server. You don't need to worry about the <tt>.htaccess</tt> file, but make sure that your <tt>config.php</tt> file is close to, or identical to, your Web server's version.</p>
</li>
<li>
<p>In your config.php files (on the server where you run the queue daemon), set the following variable:</p>
<p><tt>$config['queue']['daemon'] = true;</tt></p>
</li>
<li>
<p>On the queues server, run the command <tt>scripts/startdaemons.sh</tt>.</p>
<p>This will run the queue handlers:</p>
<dl>
<dt>queuedaemon.php</dt> <dd>polls for queued items for inbox processing and pushing out to OStatus, SMS, XMPP, etc.</dd>
<dt>imdaemon.php</dt> <dd>if an IM plugin is enabled (like XMPP)</dd>
<dt>(plugins)</dt> <dd>other daemons, like TwitterBridge ones, that you may have enabled</dd>
</dl>
</li>
</ol>
<p>These daemons will automatically restart in most cases of failure including memory leaks (if a memory_limit is set), but may still die or behave oddly if they lose connections to the XMPP or queue servers.</p>
<p>It may be a good idea to use a daemon-monitoring service, like 'monit', to check their status and keep them running.</p>
<p>All the daemons write their process IDs (pids) to <tt>/var/run/</tt> by default. This can be useful for starting, stopping, and monitoring the daemons. If you are running multiple sites on the same machine, it will be necessary to avoid collisions of these PID files by setting a site-specific directory in <tt>config.php</tt>:
<p><tt>$config['daemon']['piddir'] = __DIR__ . '/../run/';</tt></p>
<p>It is also possible to use a STOMP server instead of our kind of hacky home-grown DB-based queue solution. This is strongly recommended for best response time, especially when using XMPP.</p>
{HEADING:SECTION:gs1.1_to_gs1.2:Nightly or GNU social 1.1.x to GNU social 1.2.x}
<p>If you are tracking the GNU social git repository, we currently recommend using the "master" branch (or nightly if you want to use latest features) and follow this procedure:</p>
<ol>
<li>
<p>Back up your data. The StatusNet upgrade discussions below have some guidelines to back up the database and files (mysqldump and rsync).</p>
</li>
<li>
<p>Stop your queue daemons (you can run this command even if you do not use the queue daemons):</p>
<p><tt>$ bash scripts/stopdaemons.sh</tt></p>
</li>
<li>
<p>Run the command to fetch the latest sourcecode:</p>
<p><tt>$ git pull</tt></p>
<p>If you are not using git we recommend following the instructions below for upgrading "StatusNet 1.1.x to GNU social 1.2.x" as they are similar.</p>
</li>
<li>
<p>Run the upgrade script:</p>
<p><tt>$ php scripts/upgrade.php</tt></p>
<p>The upgrade script will likely take a long time because it will upgrade the tables to another character encoding and make other automated upgrades. Make sure it ends without errors. If you get errors, create a new issue on the <a href="https://git.gnu.io/gnu/gnu-social/issues">GNU social project page</a>.
</li>
<li>
<p>Start your queue daemons again (you can run this command even if you do not use the queue daemons):</p>
<p><tt>$ bash scripts/startdaemons.sh</tt></p>
</li>
<li>
<p>Report any issues at <a href="https://git.gnu.io/gnu/gnu-social/issues">https://git.gnu.io/gnu/gnu-social/issues</a></p>
</li>
</ol>
<p>If you are using ssh keys to log in to your server, you can make this procedure pretty painless (assuming you have automated backups already). Make sure you "cd" into the correct directory (in this case "htdocs") and use the correct login@hostname combo:</p>
<pre> $ ssh social@domain.example 'cd htdocs
&& bash scripts/stopdaemons.sh
&& git pull
&& time php scripts/upgrade.php
&& bash scripts/startdaemons.sh'
</pre>
{HEADING:SECTION:sn1.1_to_gs1.2:StatusNet 1.1.x to GNU social 1.2.x}
<p>We cannot support migrating from any other version of StatusNet than 1.1.1. If you are running a StatusNet version lower than this, please follow the upgrade procedures for each respective StatusNet version.</p>
<p>You are now running StatusNet 1.1.1 and want to migrate to GNU social 1.2.x. Beware there may be changes in minimum required version of PHP and the modules required, so review the INSTALL file (php5-intl is a newly added dependency for example).</p>
<p><b>Before you begin: Make backups</b>. Always make backups. Of your entire directory structure and the database too. All tables. All data. Alles.</p>
<ol>
<li>
<p>Make a backup of everything. To backup the database, you can use a variant of this command (you will be prompted for the database password):</p>
<p><tt>$ mysqldump -u dbuser -p dbname > social-backup.sql</tt></p>
</li>
<li>
<p>Stop your queue daemons.</p>
<p><tt>$ bash scripts/stopdaemons.sh</tt></p>
<p>Not everyone runs queue daemons, but the above command won't hurt.</p>
</li>
<li>
<p>Unpack your GNU social code to a fresh directory. You can do this by cloning our git repository:</p>
<p><tt>$ git clone https://git.gnu.io/gnu/gnu-social.git gnusocial</tt></p>
</li>
<li>
<p>Synchronize your local files to the GNU social directory. These will be the local files such as avatars, config and files:</p>
<ul>
<li><tt>avatar/*</tt></li>
<li><tt>file/*</tt></li>
<li><tt>local/*</tt></li>
<li><tt>.htaccess</tt></li>
<li><tt>config.php</tt></li>
</ul>
<p>This command will point you in the right direction on how to do it:</p>
<p><tt>$ rsync -avP statusnet/{.htaccess,avatar,file,local,config.php} gnusocial/</tt></p>
</li>
<li>
<p>Replace your old StatusNet directory with the new GNU social directory in your webserver root.</p>
</li>
<li>
<p>Run the upgrade script:</p>
<p><tt>$ php scripts/upgrade.php</tt></p>
<p>The upgrade script will likely take a long time because it will upgrade the tables to another character encoding and make other automated upgrades. Make sure it ends without errors. If you get errors, create a new issue on the <a href="https://git.gnu.io/gnu/gnu-social/issues">GNU social project page</a>.
</li>
<li>
<p>Start your queue daemons:</p>
<p><tt>$ bash scripts/startdaemons.sh</tt></p>
</li>
<li>
<p>Report any issues at <a href="https://git.gnu.io/gnu/gnu-social/issues">https://git.gnu.io/gnu/gnu-social/issues</a></p>
</li>
</ol>
<div class="spacer"></div>
<div class="navigation">
<div class="left"><a href="{PREV_URL}">{PREV_TITLE}</a></div>
<div class="right"><a href="{NEXT_URL}">{NEXT_TITLE}</a></div>
<div class="centre"><a href="{TOC_URL}">{TOC_TITLE}</a></div>
</div>
<hr />
<div class="footer">
<div class="left">Generated {TIMESTAMP}</div> <div class="right">Revision: {GIT_REV_ID} (<a href="https://git.gnu.io/tom/social-doc">src/license</a>)</div>
</div>
</div>
</body>
</html>
<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en">
<head>
<meta charset="utf-8">
<title>{PAGE_TITLE} - {TITLE} - GNU social</title>
<link rel="stylesheet" href="{RES:manual-style.css}">
</head>
<body><div class="contents">
<div class="heading">
<img src="{RES:logo.png}" width="175" height="55" />
<h1>{TITLE}</h1>
</div>
<div class="navigation">
<div class="left"><a href="{PREV_URL}">{PREV_TITLE}</a></div>
<div class="right"><a href="{NEXT_URL}">{NEXT_TITLE}</a></div>
<div class="centre"><a href="{TOC_URL}">{TOC_TITLE}</a></div>
</div>
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<div class="toc-h1"><a href="{TOC_ENTRY_PAGE}#{TOC_ENTRY_SECTION}">{TOC_ENTRY_NUMBER}</a> {TOC_ENTRY_TITLE}</div>
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<div class="toc-h2"><a href="{TOC_ENTRY_PAGE}#{TOC_ENTRY_SECTION}">{TOC_ENTRY_NUMBER}</a> {TOC_ENTRY_TITLE}</div>
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{HEADING:SECTION:exploring:Exploring the network}
<p>To get the most out of GNU social you need to find your way around the various servers.</p>
{HEADING:SUBSECTION:exploring_timelines:The different timelines}
<p>If you've used Twitter before you're used to the <em>Home</em> timeline. This shows messages posted by people you follow. Because GNU social consists of separate servers you can browse three different timelines:</p>
<dl>
<dt>Home</dt> <dd>People you follow</dd>
<dt>Public / Public Timeline</dt> <dd>Everybody on this server</dd>
<dt>Network / The Whole Known Network</dt> <dd>Everybody that this server knows about</dd>
</dl>
<p>This is how it would look if you followed two people on the same server as you, plus two people from different servers:</p>
<a href="{RES:home-vs-public.png}">
<img src="{RES:home-vs-public.png}" alt="Difference between home and public timelines" class="figure" />
</a>
{HEADING:SECTION:following:Following}
<p>Thanks to federation it is easy to follow both people on the same server as you and on different servers. However, following someone on a different server can require a couple of extra clicks.</p>
<p>If you're on one of the <i>Quitter</i> servers (or any server that uses the Qvitter plugin) there is an easy way to do both. See {LINK:remote_follow_qvitter}.</p>
{HEADING:SUBSECTION:local_follow:Following people on the same server}
<p>Click on their username to go to their user page. There you will find a button to follow them. It will look like one of these:</p>
<img src="{RES:subscribe-button.png}" alt="Stock GNU social subscribe button" class="figure" />
<img src="{RES:follow-button.png}" alt="Qvitter follow button" class="figure" />
<p>Click the button. Their notices will now appear in your Home timeline.</p>
{HEADING:SUBSECTION:remote_follow:Following people on other servers}
<p>First go to their user page. You can always get there by clicking on their username. This will take you to the server where that person has their account.</p>
<p>Suppose your account is on <em>quitter.no</em> and you clicked on a user who is on <em>quitter.se</em>. Your browser will now be at an address like <tt>https://quitter.se/some_user</tt>. You will not be logged in on the remote server&mdash;you're just a public visitor. Don't try to log in or create an account; it's not necessary.</p>
<p>The page might look completely different from what you're used to! Every server can have its own custom style. What you need to look for is the remote follow button. Here are three examples:</p>
<img src="{RES:remote-follow-button.png}" alt="Qvitter remote follow button" class="figure" />
<img src="{RES:subscribe-button.png}" alt="Stock GNU social subscribe button (same as for local)" class="figure" />
<img src="{RES:subscribe-loadaverage.png}" alt="LoadAverage subscribe button" class="figure" />
<p>Click on it. A box will pop up asking what your account is, in email address format. If your username is <tt>fido</tt> and your server is <tt>quitter.no</tt> you would type <tt>fido@quitter.no</tt>. Then click <em>Subscribe</em> or <em>Remote follow</em> as appropriate.</p>
<a href="{RES:remote-part-2.png}">
<img src="{RES:remote-part-2.png}" alt="Entering your address" class="figure" />
</a>
<p>You might (or might not) be taken to an intermediate screen like this one. Check the details are correct and click <em>Subscribe</em> again.</p>
<a href="{RES:remote-part-3.png}">
<img src="{RES:remote-part-3.png}" alt="Remote follow, next step" class="figure" />
</a>
<p>You will now be taken back your own server where you're logged in. You will be shown profile information about the user you are about to follow. To complete the process click the <em>Confirm</em> button. It will look something like this:</p>
<img src="{RES:confirm-stock.png}" alt="Stock confirm button" class="figure" />
<img src="{RES:confirm-qvitter.png}" alt="Quitter.no confirm button (I guess qvitter hasn't styled it)" class="figure" />
<p>You are now following that person. Notices that they post from now on will now appear in your Home timeline. If someone else on your server was already following them you might get some older ones as well.</p>
{HEADING:SUBSECTION:remote_follow_qvitter:Following people using Qvitter}
<p>Qvitter has a handy shortcut for following people regardless of whether or not they're on the same server as you. Hover your mouse pointer over their name. A popup will appear. Click the <em>Follow</em> button.</p>
<a href="{RES:qvitter-hover1.png}">
<img src="{RES:qvitter-hover1.png}" alt="Hovering over a name in qvitter" class="figure" />
</a>
<p>It will change to <em>Following</em>. You're all done.</p>
<a href="{RES:qvitter-hover2.png}">
<img src="{RES:qvitter-hover2.png}" alt="Now following" class="figure" />
</a>
{HEADING:SUBSECTION:remote_follow_manual:Following people using manual subscription URL}
<p><i>Note: This is not the usual way to follow someone but it's a technique some people find convenient.</i></p>
<p>You can initiate a remote follow directly from your own server. To do this visit <tt>/main/ostatussub</tt> on your server. For example if you are logged in to quitter.se you would go to <tt>https://quitter.se/main/ostatussub</tt>. You will get to a page with an error like this:</p>
<a href="{RES:manual-confirm.png}">
<img src="{RES:manual-confirm.png}" alt="First page of the ostatussub confirmation" class="figure" />
</a>
<p>Enter a profile address such as <tt>https://quitter.no/doctorow</tt> and click <em>Continue</em>. You will jump straight to the confirmation screen as shown above.</p>
{HEADING:SECTION:choosing_a_server:Choosing a server}
<p>You have to make one decision to get on GNU social: which server to use. If you're technically inclined and want to host your own then <a href="https://git.gnu.io/gnu/gnu-social">you can do that</a>. For everyone else there are many choices available. Many of them are listed on <a href="http://www.skilledtests.com/wiki/List_of_Independent_Statusnet_Instances">this webpage</a>.</p>
<p>If you don't want to shop around, these are some popular choices, particularly for English speakers:</p>
<ul>
<li><a href="https://quitter.se/">Quitter.se</a></li>
<li><a href="https://loadaverage.org/">LoadAverage</a></li>
<li><a href="https://quitter.no/">Quitter.no</a></li>
</ul>
<p>There is a small advantage in choosing either a local server or a server where you already know people. Every server has a user directory that lists all the accounts registered there. This can make it easier for others to stumble across you.</p>
<p>Although there are many servers not all of them allow members of the public to create new accounts. The administrator of each server can turn this feature on or off.</p>
{HEADING:SECTION:registering:Registering an account}
<p>In this example we will use <a href="https://quitter.no/">Quitter.no</a>, which allows new users to register freely. This server looks very similar to Twitter because it is using a plugin called <a href="https://git.gnu.io/h2p/Qvitter">Qvitter</a>. If you don't like the appearance then you can simply pick a different server.</p>
<p>It has a Sign Up section on the bottom-left of the home page. Enter your basic information and click <i>Sign up to Quitter.no</i>:</p>
<a href="{RES:qno_signup.jpg}">
<img src="{RES:qno_signup_small.jpg}" alt="Sign Up section of quitter.no" class="figure" />
</a>
<p>You will be prompted for extra information:<p>
<a href="{RES:qno_signup_details.png}">
<img src="{RES:qno_signup_details_small.png}" alt="Sign Up Details section of quitter.no" class="figure" />
</a>
<p>Your nickname is the main name for your account. You won't be able to change it so choose carefully. You can also set a "Full Name" that appears on your profile and alongside your notices. Don't feel obligated to use any real information&mdash;anonymous and pseudonymous users are very welcome on GNU social.</p>
<p>A working email address is normally required for account verification. You can use it to receive email notifications too.</p>
<p>Choose a good password. As always it is a good idea to use a password that you don't use anywhere else. Free software like <a href="https://www.keepassx.org/">KeePassX</a> can help you generate and remember your passwords.</p>
<p>Press the <i>Sign up to Quitter.no</i> button. You can start using your account right away but you should confirm your email address when the email comes through.</p>
<p>Congratulations! You're on GNU social!</p>
{HEADING:SECTION:publishing:Publishing a notice}
<p>Depending on which server you're using you might see something different once you log in. Here are two examples:</p>
<a href="{RES:send_example_1.png}">
<img src="{RES:send_example_1_small.png}" alt="Publishing a notice on a standard server" class="figure" />
</a>
<a href="{RES:send_example_2.png}">
<img src="{RES:send_example_2_small.png}" alt="Publishing a notice on a Qvitter server" class="figure" />
</a>
<p>In both cases you have a text box to type a message. Click inside it, type a notice, then click <i>Send</i> to publish it to your followers.</p>
{HEADING:SECTION:repeat_reply:Favouriting, Repeating and Replying}
<p>After you have followed a few of your friends and interesting people on the network you will see their posts on your "HOME" newsfeed. Below each post are some icons that allow you to interact with the notice and/or the original poster.</p>
<p>Clicking on the <img src="{RES:reply.gif}"> will add a post text field to the page and allow you to respond to the post. Your reply will then appear as a threaded notice underneath the original post, as in this example:</p>
<a href="{RES:reply_example_1.png}">
<img src="{RES:reply_example_1.png}" alt="Replying to a notice" class="figure" />
</a>
<p>Clicking on the <img src="{RES:favourite.gif}"> will add the post to your list of favourite posts. This also pings the original poster alerting them that you favourited the post. You can see your list of favourite posts by clicking on the "FAVOURITES" link on the left navigation bar. If you are using <a href="https://github.com/chimo/gs-reverseFavs">Chimo's Reverse Favourites</a> plugin you can see who has favourited your previous posts.
<p>Clicking on the <img src="{RES:recycle.gif}"> will repeat the notice so that it will be shared to your own list of followers, and as such probably implies another more explicit favour to the original post.</p>
{HEADING:SECTION:groups_tags:Hashtags, Mentions and Groups}
<p>In addition to the above methods to interact with followers network, GNU social also supports features you will find familiar with other social networks. You can mention someone else in a post by using the '@' prefix. This example shows how to mention someone, and how the post will look after you post it.<p>
<a href="{RES:mention_example_1.png}">
<img src="{RES:mention_example_1.png}" alt="Mentioning a user in a post" class="figure" />
</a>
<p>You don't have to use the full 'username@domain.tld' format when mentioning someone. If you leave out the full '@domain.tld' part of a user you are mentioning then you are limiting the scope to people on your local instance and your followers.
<p>The social network hashtag '#' prefixed before a word, eg #federated makes keywords trend on your home feed and across the federated network as more people use the same hashtag</p>
<p>Groups are an optional part of GNU social. Each social instance can have one or more groups based on a topic. Then local users of the instance as well as remote social users can subscribe to the group. A group is similar to a user in GNU social but you refer to a group using the '!' prefix instead of the '@' prefix.</p>
<p>When you find a group on your local GNU social instance, or a remote instance you can follow it in a similar way to following users, simply enter your GNU social username when prompted after clicking on the "Join" button.</p>
<p>You can post a notice to the group by mentioning the group with a '!' prefix, for example:</p>
<a href="{RES:grouppost_example_1.png}">
<img src="{RES:grouppost_example_1.png}" alt="Making a post mentioning a group." class="figure" />
</a>
<p>Your post will then appear in your follower's feeds as well as anyone else subscribed to the group who may or may not also follow you.</p>
{HEADING:SECTION:account_names:Referring to your account}
<p>For somebody else to find you on GNU social you need to give them two pieces of information:</p>
<ol>
<li>What server you're on&mdash;for example, <i>quitter.no</i></li>
<li>Your account name. That's the one starting with an <i>@</i>&mdash;for example, <i>@fred</i>
</ol>
<p>There are three different ways of referring to your account and they're useful at different times.</p>
{HEADING:SUBSECTION:account_profile_url:Your profile URL}
<p>If you want someone to check out your account the easiest thing is to give them a link to your profile. They don't need a GNU social account of their own. If they have one and they want to follow you they will be able to do that easily from this page.</p>
<p>To access your profile click on your name. On quitter.no it's in the top-left and looks vaguely like this:</p>
<img src="{RES:qno_profile_link.png}" alt="Link to your profile on quitter.no" class="figure" />
<p>On a more standard server you can look for something in the menu called <i>Profile</i>:</p>
<img src="{RES:taslug_profile_link.png}" alt="Link to your profile on a standard GNU social server" class="figure" />
<p>Either way once you get there your browser will be at a URL that looks similar to this:</p>
<p><tt>https://quitter.no/fred</tt></p>
<p>Take that URL and give it to the person who wants to see your account.</p>
{HEADING:SUBSECTION:account_email_format:Doing a remote follow}
<p>Another way to describe your account is like an email address. You write your username, move the @ from the start to the end, then write the server without any <i>http</i>s or slashes:</p>
<p><tt>fred@quitter.no</tt></p>
<p>This is what you need to type in if you are doing a Remote Follow&mdash;that is, following someone on a different server from you. More about that in a later section: {LINK:remote_follow}.</p>
{HEADING:SUBSECTION:account_at_format:Writing notices}
<p>If you're writing a notice and want to mention another user simply tag their account with an @ like this: <i>@fred - Have you met @sandra? She's a colleague of mine.</i></p>
<p>You might be thinking that the server part is missing. You're right! But GNU social is clever. If you use an @ tag in a notice it assumes you must be talking about someone you follow. It looks through its database to find which account has that name and fills out the server part behind the scenes.</p>
{HEADING:SECTION:getting_started_next_steps:Next steps}
<p>In this part you signed up for GNU social and sent your first notice. This will quickly get boring unless you find some other people to follow. The next part describes the different ways you can explore the GNU social network and see what everyone else is saying.</p>
{HEADING:SECTION:tags:Tags}
On GNU social you will sometimes see words with a <tt>#</tt> or a <tt>!</tt> in front of them. The first is a hashtag; the second is a group. They are boths ways of linking together posts that relate to the same topic. They work in different ways.
{HEADING:SECTION:hashtags:Hashtags}
{HEADING:SUBSECTION:hashtags_using:Using hashtags}
<p>If you put a # in front of a word like <tt>#this</tt> then that word becomes a clickable link. When you click it you are shown messages from everyone that contain that same <em>hashtag</em>. It allows you to quickly find others who were posting about the same topic, or to bring your post to the attention of those who are watching the tag. Twitter turned the concept into a household name and it's now a staple of microblogging.</p>
<img src="{RES:typing-hashtag.png}" alt="Typing a hashtag in a post" class="figure" />
<p>Click on the link in a post to see all posts that include the tag:</p>
<img src="{RES:showing-hashtag.png}" alt="Browsing a hashtag stream" class="figure" />
<p>Note that this cannot show posts from the entire GNU social network. This limitation is explained more in the next section.</p>
<p>For network-wide conversations about particular topics, see the section about {LINK:groups}. Groups perform a similar function to hashtags and they use a <tt>!</tt> instead of a <tt>#</tt>.</p>
{HEADING:SUBSECTION:hashtags_limits:The limited reach of hashtags}
<p>Hashtags are somewhat limited in GNU social because your server does not have a complete view of the network. Suppose your server has 10 accounts on it. Obviously it knows about every post that those 10 people make. If each person follows 10 different people on remote servers, that's 100 extra people. All together your server knows about the posts from 110 accounts.</p>
<p>If you click on a hashtag on your server, it's only ever possible to see posts from those 110 people.</p>
<p>Note also that hashtags are linked to the server where you posted. If your account is on quitter.no and you use the tag <tt>#newyearseve</tt>, anyone who clicks on it will see quitter.no's list. If somebody on quitter.se uses the same tag, clicking on that tag will show you quitter.se's list. These lists might be different because each server has a different view of the network.</p>
<p>The GNU social federation has lots of benefits but you can see that it makes hashtags a little complicated. {LINK:groups} are a popular alternative that are more reliable.</p>
{HEADING:SUBSECTION:hashtags_subscribing:Hashtag subscriptions}
<p>You can subscribe to hashtags on your own server. This means that any time your server sees a post containing the hashtag, that post will appear in your <i>Home</i> timeline regardless of whether you normally follow the person who sent it.</p>
<p>The button to subscribe appears when you click on a hashtag. Note that this is not visible if you are using Qvitter (i.e. any of the "quitter" servers). You can access it by switching to the "classic" mode.</p>
<img src="{RES:subscribe-hashtag.png}" alt="Subscribing to a hashtag" class="figure" />
<p>Once you are subscribed, not only will those posts appear in your home timeline, but you will also get quick access to the tag in your left menu. From there you can unsubscribe again.</p>
<img src="{RES:subscribed-tag.png}" alt="Subscribed to a hashtag" class="figure" />
{HEADING:SECTION:groups:Groups}
{HEADING:SUBSECTION:groups_using:Joining groups}
<p>A group is effectively a noticeboard hosted on a particular server. If you join as a member of a group you can post messages to it by including a group tag. Every time a member makes a post to the group it is submitted to the hosting server. The hosting server then passes it on to all the members. This means that if you join you are guaranteed to see every post in your Home timeline. This is different from subscribing to {LINK:hashtags}, which are shown on a best-effort basis.</p>
<p>You will probably first notice a group in your timeline as a link you can click:</p>
<img src="{RES:group-in-timeline.png}" alt="A group in a timeline" class="figure" />
<p>Clicking on the word <tt>!tinsel</tt> takes you to the group page on the hosting server. If you want to join the group, click the Join button:</p>